Available courses

Citizen Science in the Classroom: A toolkit
Maria Grau Maria Grau

Citizen Science in the Classroom: A toolkit

This is a free course of 2 hours that benefits from access to the lessons learned from COMPASS, a citizen science project competitively funded by the Spanish Government and aimed to evaluate the usability of a mHealth intervention in a primary school setting. No prior knowledge in science reporting is needed for this course.

By the end of this course, the learner will be able to:

  • Recognize the key stages of a citizen science project and the required adaptation to the particular circumstances of a primary or secondary school
  • Understand and learn how to build community before planning a citizen science project
  • Plan the systematic procedure of data collection and the process of analysis and interpretation of information gathered in the classroom context 
  • Highlight the evaluation of citizen science projects, once finished, as a tool to improve the processes and outcomes.

The enrolment key to this course is: ClassroomToolkit

Badges creation mini-course
Claudia FC Claudia FC

Badges creation mini-course

This is an extremely short course mock-up so that Fran can do his wonderful I.T. magic and figure out why the badges are disappearing down a black hole. We're all very grateful to him, but we don't recommend you put this course on your CV.

Začnime si s občianskou vedou (Let's start with the citizen science)
Eva Holla Eva HollaJitka Dobb Jitka DobbMaria Habrmanova Maria HabrmanovaSilvia Horakova Silvia HorakovaZuzana Stožická Zuzana Stožická

Začnime si s občianskou vedou (Let's start with the citizen science)

Slovak: Na Slovensku ešte nie je pojem občianska veda širšie známy laickej ani odbornej verejnosti. Aktuálne sa realizuje len malý počet projektov občianskej vedy. Preto sme vytvorili tento úvodný kurz, aby na Slovensku pomáhal šíriť myšlienky občianskej vedy, jej potenciál pre rozvoj spoločnosti a povedomie o dobrej praxi v rámci vedeckej komunity a mimo nej. Projekty občianskej vedy vyžadujú participáciu širokého spektra účastníkov s rôznym profesným a vzdelanostným profilom (z ktorých nie všetci ovládajú angličtinu na vysokej úrovni), preto považujeme za dôležité položiť základy vedomostí o občianskej vede a diskutovať o jej terminológii v slovenskom jazyku. 

Tréningový modul predstavuje koncepciu občianskej vedy, jej výhody pre vedeckú komunitu, ako aj pre širokú verejnosť a zároveň poskytuje účastníkom základnú terminológiu a náhľad na dôležitosť spojenia medzi vedeckou komunitou a aktívnymi občanmi. 

Modul pozostáva z 5 sekcií, ktoré sa venujú konkrétnym vývojovým krokom nevyhnutným pre budovanie a úspech projektu občianskej vedy: hľadanie príležitostí, dizajn projektu, spolupráca s partnermi, zbieranie údajov, etické otázky a dosah projektu. Každá sekcia obsahuje teoretickú časť a krátke videá, v ktorých zástupcovia projektov občianskej vedy zo Slovenska zdieľajú svoje skúsenosti.

English: In the Slovak Republic, the concept of citizen science is not yet widely familiar or taught at university level. Only a small number of citizen science projects is running. Therefore, we developed an introductory course in Slovak to spread the ideas of citizen science, its society-advancing potential and good practice awareness in and outside of the scientific community. In the field calling for participation of stakeholders with different professional and educational backgrounds (not equally proficient in English) it is essential to start, lay the foundation of knowledge and discuss the terminology in Slovak language.

The training module introduces the concept of citizen science, its advantages for the scientific community as well as for the general public, while providing participants with basic terminology and insight into the importance of the connection between the scientific community and active citizens.
The module consists of 5 sections dedicated to particular development steps substantial for building and success of citizen science project – looking for opportunities, designing the project, cooperation with partners, data management and ethical issues, and an impact of the project. Each section contains theoretical background and short videos of people from Slovakia contributing to or working on citizen science projects in practice, sharing their experiences.

Your Right to Privacy Online
Huma Shah Huma ShahJaimz Winter Jaimz Winter

Your Right to Privacy Online

This is a free course designed over five steps that can be taken one step at a time, or all steps completed within three hours.

The course is designed to assist the general public with understanding of ‘personal data’ and our rights to privacy online.

Our data is collected across the Internet through digital technologies in websites, and in apps (software programmes on mobile devices). These technologies include cookies, small text files placed on desktop computers, laptops or smart devices (tablets, mobile phones) when you visit a page on the Internet. Cookies can include digital trackers, such as tracking the precise location of your device. App settings can have permissions to access your contacts, your camera, your messages, microphone and other data on your mobile devices. The location of a device can personally identify a person who uses or owns the device, so its tracking has data protection and privacy implications.

By the end of this course, this course will benefit you as a learner by:

-       being able to understand privacy and its historical context;

-       recognising what ‘personal data’ is;

-       identifying the ways personal data is collected across the Internet, including through tracking cookies in websites;

-       learning about the regulations that grant us rights to privacy online;

-       gaining knowledge about free online tools that help you explore beneath websites and apps, and turn off tracking technologies.

In summary, you will gain valuable knowledge about human right to privacy and  practical skills to stop your data being collected across the Internet without your consent.

The enrolment key for this course is CSICOP.

Citizen Science Projects: How to make a difference (Part 4)

Citizen Science Projects: How to make a difference (Part 4)

Learn to capture and analyse data and use the findings to take action.

Would you like to understand the environment and other global challenges to help create change? Citizen science projects and citizen observatories are the ideal way to explore big issues, take action and become a changemaker.

This is the fourth part of a four-part course designed by the WeObserve project partners (see the bottom of this page for further details) that takes approximately 3-hours to complete. You need no prior knowledge of citizen science to complete this course.

In this part we will cover:

  • Disseminating results, 
  • How citizen science informs decision-making,
  • Planning action and creating change,
  • Measuring impacts

The enrolment key for this course is weobserve4

The WeObserve project received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement no 776740. The project consortium was made up of the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) in Austria, IHE Delft Institute for Water Education in The Netherlands, Centre for Research on Ecology and Forestry Applications (CREAF) in Spain, Institute of Communication and Computer Systems (ICCS) in Greece, University of Dundee in Scotland, European Citizen Science Association (ECSA) in Germany and Autorita di Bacino dei Fiumi Isonzo Tagliamento Livenza Piave Brenta Bacchiglione (AAWA) in Italy. The entire contents of this course can also be found here: DOI 10.20933/100001193


Citizen Science Projects: How to Make a Difference (Part 3)

Citizen Science Projects: How to Make a Difference (Part 3)

Learn to capture and analyse data and use the findings to take action.

Would you like to understand the environment and other global challenges to help create change? Citizen science projects and citizen observatories are the ideal way to explore big issues, take action and become a changemaker.

This is the third of a four-part course designed by the WeObserve project partners (see the bottom of this page for further details) that takes approximately 3-hours to complete. You need no prior knowledge of citizen science to complete this course.

This part of the course is focused on data and we will cover the following aspects:

  • managing the data,
  • understanding the data,
  • analysing the data,
  • visualising the data.

The enrolment key for this course is weobserve3

The WeObserve project received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement no 776740. The project consortium was made up of the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) in Austria, IHE Delft Institute for Water Education in The Netherlands, Centre for Research on Ecology and Forestry Applications (CREAF) in Spain, Institute of Communication and Computer Systems (ICCS) in Greece, University of Dundee in Scotland, European Citizen Science Association (ECSA) in Germany and Autorita di Bacino dei Fiumi Isonzo Tagliamento Livenza Piave Brenta Bacchiglione (AAWA) in Italy. The entire contents of this course can also be found here: DOI 10.20933/100001193

Citizen Science Projects: How to Make a Difference (Part 2)

Citizen Science Projects: How to Make a Difference (Part 2)

Learn to capture and analyse data and use the findings to take action.

Would you like to understand the environment and other global challenges to help create change? Citizen science projects and citizen observatories are the ideal way to explore big issues, take action and become a changemaker.

This is the second of a four-part course designed by the WeObserve project partners (see the bottom of this page for further details) that takes approximately 3-hours to complete. You need no prior knowledge of citizen science to complete this course.

In this part we will:

  • help you to decide what data you need to collect as part of your project, and the challenges you might encounter;
  • introduce you to a range of tools for collecting data and how to set-up a protocol for collecting data;
  • reflect on the experience gained from several other projects on how to train data collectors;
  • introduce you to Makerspaces and DIY citizen science.

The enrolment key for this course is weobserve2

The WeObserve project received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement no 776740. The project consortium was made up of the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) in Austria, IHE Delft Institute for Water Education in The Netherlands, Centre for Research on Ecology and Forestry Applications (CREAF) in Spain, Institute of Communication and Computer Systems (ICCS) in Greece, University of Dundee in Scotland, European Citizen Science Association (ECSA) in Germany and Autorita di Bacino dei Fiumi Isonzo Tagliamento Livenza Piave Brenta Bacchiglione (AAWA) in Italy. The entire contents of this course can also be found here: DOI 10.20933/100001193

Citizen Science Projects: How to Make a Difference (Part 1)

Citizen Science Projects: How to Make a Difference (Part 1)

Learn to capture and analyse data and use the findings to take action.

Would you like to understand the environment and other global challenges to help create change? Citizen science projects and citizen observatories are the ideal way to explore big issues, take action and become a changemaker.

This is the first of a four-part course designed by the WeObserve project partners (see the bottom of this page for further details) that takes approximately 3-hours to complete. You need no prior knowledge of citizen science to complete this course.

In this part we will:

  • introduce you to citizen science and citizen observatories; 
  • teach you about best-practices in the field;
  • learn how your observatory or campaign team can begin to understand an environmental issue you are concerned about using a useful mapping technique;
  • learn how to choose a question – a central part of any observatory or citizen science campaign. You'll also hear about how our observatories did this, and we'll also explore campaign design. 
  • look at how to form an active and engaged team as part of your observatory or campaign. You'll get some advice from our observatories and we'll talk about wider community-building.

The enrolment key for this course is weobserve1

The WeObserve project received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement no 776740. The project consortium was made up of the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) in Austria, IHE Delft Institute for Water Education in The Netherlands, Centre for Research on Ecology and Forestry Applications (CREAF) in Spain, Institute of Communication and Computer Systems (ICCS) in Greece, University of Dundee in Scotland, European Citizen Science Association (ECSA) in Germany and Autorita di Bacino dei Fiumi Isonzo Tagliamento Livenza Piave Brenta Bacchiglione (AAWA) in Italy. The entire contents of this course can also be found here: DOI 10.20933/100001193

Introduction to Citizen Science

Introduction to Citizen Science

This is a free course of approximately 1.5 hours for citizen science practitioners and researchers, that provides you with a basic introduction to citizen science and requires no prior knowledge of the subject.

The course will help you to:

  1. define citizen science,
  2. understand the history and significance of citizen science and how it has evolved into the modern-day practice we see today,
  3. understand the different typologies that have been created to explain the varying levels of public participation in citizen science. By the end of this course you will better understand the key characteristics of citizen science.

At the end of each section there is a short quiz or activity, and a ten question quiz at the end of the course. If you score 50% or more in the final quiz then you will earn a course completion badge and certificate.

The enrolment key for this course is INTROTOCITSCI.

Introduction to Citizen Science for Journalists
Andrea Troncoso Andrea TroncosoClaudia FC Claudia FCLucie LucieLucie Steigleder Lucie Steigleder

Introduction to Citizen Science for Journalists

This is a free course of an hour and a half, that provides an introduction to citizen science, which is a form of active public engagement in science. The interest in citizen science, the number of projects, and the number of people who participate in such activities have grown significantly over the last decade.

This course will introduce you to core aspects of the field, the activities that fall under it, issues that are frequently discussed about citizen science (data quality and motivation), and the type of stories that are commonly told about citizen science activities. It is aimed at journalists, who need to understand citizen science in their reporting.

No prior knowledge in science reporting is needed for this course. 

Enrollment key: Introforjurno2CS

Citizen Science Typologies

Citizen Science Typologies

This is a free course of 1.5 hours for anyone wishing to learn about the different approaches for classifying citizen science activities. This course requires some basic knowledge and understanding of citizen science.

The course will cover:

  1. An introduction to citizen science, a definition of typologies and the challenges of classifying citizen science activities.

  2. Three of the most commonly used typologies for classifying citizen science activities: the Wiggins’ and Crowston typology, the 5C’s by Shirk et al. and Haklay’s Levels of Participation.

At the end of each section there is a short quiz or activity, and a ten question quiz at the end of the course. If you score 50% or more in the final quiz then you will earn a course completion badge and certificate.

The enrolment key for this course is: typologies.


Designing for learning through citizen science

Designing for learning through citizen science

This is a free two hour course that provides an introduction to designing and delivering citizen science projects to enhance learning outcomes.

It is targeted at an audience of both formal and informal educators, as well as citizen science practitioners more generally. It is recommended that participants take the Introduction to Citizen Science module before beginning this one.

By the end of this course you will be aware of the learning opportunities that citizen science projects can present, and have strategies for how to design/re-design, and deliver citizen activities that facilitate them.

The enrolment key for this course is: learningcitsci


Leading a ‘Train the Trainer’ workshop

Leading a ‘Train the Trainer’ workshop

This is a free course of 1.5 hours for citizen science practitioners looking to employ ‘Train the Trainer’ within their project or activity. Train the Trainer (TTT) is a learning method that equips people with the skills and understanding of a project, in order to deliver training, programmes or projects to others. No prior knowledge of the TTT technique or strategy are needed.

By the end of this course, the learner will:

  1.      Understand what ‘Train the Trainer’ is and how it can benefit citizen science projects
  2.      The fundamental components of a TTT course
  3.      How to plan the learning journey for their own TTT course
  4.      The key considerations to make if they wish to utilise TTT methodologies

This guidance is aimed primarily at contributory citizen science projects, and provides advice mainly to those who wish to host face-to-face training. Many of the principles can also be adapted to suit online trainings. The concept can be utilised for trainings across a broad range of subject areas, but does have a focus on environmental sciences.

The enrolment key to this course is: trainthetrainer


Doing citizen science as open science: what, why, and how
Pen-Yuan Hsing Pen-Yuan HsingRafaella Antoniou Rafaella Antoniou

Doing citizen science as open science: what, why, and how

This is a high-level, 1 hour 45 minutes course introducing the ethical imperative for conducting citizen science as open science, including what open science is and how its outputs and processes can be incorporated into all aspects of citizen science.

The primary audience are citizen science practitioners such as those already managing a project or starting a new one. However, no prior knowledge about open science is assumed, and anyone with an interest in open science are encouraged to take this course.

After completing this module, you will be able to:

  • Describe the ethical, scientific, social, and legal imperatives for practising open science
  • Clarify common misconceptions of open science (e.g. it is not just about publishing data)
  • Describe the products of open science and the collaborative and inclusive processes they enable
  • Identify which aspects of open science are and are not already implemented by your citizen science project
  • Evaluate and choose tools to implement open science for all components of your citizen science project including text, images, data, software, hardware, and other media

Storytelling for citizen science
Andrea Troncoso Andrea TroncosoAlice Sheppard

Storytelling for citizen science

This is a free two and a half hour course that provides an introduction to storytelling and gives practical tools to shape narratives to communicate about and engage with citizen science. Citizen science is  a form of active public engagement in science.

This course is designed to inspire and support anyone interested in creating a compelling story out of their projects, experiences or work, with the purpose of connecting with different audiences. We want to ignite your curiosity and motivation to try storytelling in your local contexts. No prior knowledge in storytelling or creative writing  is needed for this course. 

Citizen science has gained interest and advocates: the number of projects, and the number of people who participate in these activities, has grown significantly over the last decade. This course will give you the ground and tools to look in a different way at how you can communicate about your current project and how to craft a story that matters and connects to different audiences. It will also provide examples of stories and resources for you to study further and deeper. 

By the end of this course, you will:

  • Understand the value of stories and how they can help you connect with people when using it for communicating citizen science; 
  • Identify the elements that make a compelling story and be able to discover them in your project or your experiences
  • Explore possible narratives that are valuable to your context
  • Craft possible plots and stories and a way to share them in a compelling way

At the end of the course, there is a 10-question quiz. If you score 50% or more in this final quiz, then you will earn a course completion badge and certificate

The enrolment key to this course is: StoryCitSci

Volunteer engagement, management and care

Volunteer engagement, management and care

This is a free course of approximately 1 hour 45 minutes. It is aimed at anyone who will spend time interacting with citizen scientists - for example, recruiting people to participate in your project, blogging, or acting as a group leader or discussion forum moderator. You will need to have an overview of citizen science, but no in-depth knowledge is required.

Millions of people choose to contribute to science and have a variety of motivations to do so. Once in the project, they require feedback and communication, and, often, a space in which to discuss the project and the wider issues with their peers - and with you. Depending on the project, they may also need specific tools or learning opportunities. This course will introduce you to a variety of means to promote effective communication between everyone involved in the project, to community building, and to a deeper understanding of the citizen scientist's perspective and their needs. 

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • understand some concerns and barriers citizen scientists may face when they sign up to a project, and ways you may be able to overcome them; 
  • plan how to enable communications and discussions to take place in citizen science;
  • analyse your own citizen science project to choose the best platform for learning, feedback and community building.

The enrolment key to this course is: Volunteers